A Simple Agile Game Design/Development Process

July 2, 2014 — 2 Comments

Usually when Agile is introduced to people it’s done so with Scrum which is seemingly filled with arcane terms and voodoo ritual. Very often the context behind those rituals and terms is lost and the general advice is to, “do it by the book,” until you understand, before you adapt it. There are a couple of problems with this. Firstly that the context Scrum was developed for might not fit the context you are making games in so rather than enabling you to move faster and make better games you are standing in a corner with your wizard hat on. Secondly Scrum as an introduction obscures some of the elegance behind the Agile Principles, concerned as it is with day-to-day process in service to that elegance.

So let’s cut back to the elegance. In yesterdays post I made a simple re-drafting of the Agile Manifesto to make sense of it for games design/development. Today I’m going to take those re-drafted principles and show how they fit into a simple Agile process.

First a diagram:

simple agile

That’s it. That’s the beating heart of Agile. So simple you can describe it in one sentence. Come up with an idea, make it and try it out to see what it’s like, then use your learning to refactor your idea and processes. So simple it gets repeatedly invented in an intuitive fashion. So simple I can retire this blog forever! Done!

Well not quite, we’ve only managed to deal with a few of the Agile Principles in this loop the rest involve what happens during each stage. Currently we’re hitting:

  • Deliver a playable game frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
  • A playable game is the primary measure of progress.
  • At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

Ideate

We want to keep our ideas lightweight. Over-complicating our ideas too early means wasting a bunch of time both coming up with them and also implementing them. We’ll be refining our ideas over the course of many iterations so starting with a ‘perfect design’ is not going to help particularly as we have not yet managed to evaluate how perfect the design really is! The watch phrase some canny individual coined was “Just Barely Good Enough”.

Ideally we’re keeping these principles in mind:

  • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
  • Simplicity–the art of maximizing the amount of work not done–is essential.

Create

Creation is in many ways the ‘easy bit’ where we turn the idea into something playable. The main point to be aware of is that almost every task is going to require some Just-In-Time design. Having whiteboards (or a pad if you’re by yourself) handy is incredibly useful to quickly solve design problems. If you’re creating a videogame then this is also the time to make sure you’re refactoring the code your are working on to keep it simple, elegant and easy to work with. There are lots of ways to make this less painful but that’s outside of the scope of this post.

The principles to keep in mind are the same:

  • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
  • Simplicity–the art of maximizing the amount of work not done–is essential.

Evaluate

Evaluation means putting real people in front of your game and have them play it. Ideally you want the audience you intend to release the game to playing it as early as possible (or a close facsimile). At the very least you want some people that aren’t you playing the game to give criticism and feedback. Other developers can be good as they can excuse some of the rough edges of a product in development as well as being able to understand the ruleset and provide critique of the design. If you’re in a company then you’re probably going to have a list of stakeholders responsible for your project who should be playing every iteration and providing feedback. Other excellent although more time consuming methods include using Usability testing methods. For example doing some User Testing, a technique where you watch a players game session and take notes on friction points in the experience.

Schemes like alpha and beta testing, attending games shows, plus funding methods like Early Access also provide a host of willing playtesters. A caveat here is that the quality of the game experience does matter when showing something externally to large groups of people in a manner where there are quality expectations. First impressions count, word of mouth is important and it can be hard to dig a games name out of the toilet if every comment on articles about your game references how rubbish an early version was.

The end result should be a collated list of feedback and some action points to take into the next Ideation phase.

The principles being hit here are:

  • Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of a quality game experience.
  • Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage.

The remainder of the principles deal with things like team composition, team management and day-to-day practices that are effective rather than process. They should be kept in mind at all times.

So why is Scrum so complicated?

Well it turns out as you start to use the above process a whole bunch of questions will routinely come up that need to be answered. Some can be answered by reading the Agile principles but others need a bit of cogitating on the best way to handle them.

For example how long should it take to move through the whole loop? According to the Agile Principles:

Deliver a playable game frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. Frequently providing a playable game means frequent feedback from stakeholders, playtesters and colleagues. It is the engine of iteration.

So we want to move through the loop pretty quickly, what if our idea is complicated? Well we’re going to have to cut the idea up into chunks we can implement and we’re going to need to work out roughly what order to do them in. But that means we won’t have the “full game” playable for some time? Well we should build a prototype first so we can get early feedback on our complete game design or we won’t worry too much and let the final design fall out in the wash as we receive feedback. Scrum basically provides a ready made solution to a lot of common problems that come up when trying to implement this elegant feedback loop.

Whether you pick an off-the-shelf solution or grow your own from simple beginnings the important thing to remember is that the entire process fails if you don’t keep up the virtuous feedback loop for both the game being made and the processes you use to make it.

Trackbacks and Pingbacks:

  1. Ein ganz simpler Agiler Game Design/Development Process | GAMEDEVPORTAL - July 8, 2014

    […] Morgen mal wieder etwas  gefunden was ich durchaus richtig interessant fand. Hier macht sich entlich mal jemand Gedanken warum Scrum manchmal unter Umständen viel zu umständlich ist. Er versucht neue Ansätze zu […]

  2. EIN GANZ SIMPLER AGILER GAME DESIGN/DEVELOPMENT PROCESS – Dev-Crowd - May 12, 2016

    […] Morgen mal wieder etwas  gefunden was ich durchaus richtig interessant fand. Hier macht sich entlich mal jemand Gedanken warum Scrum manchmal unter Umständen viel zu umständlich ist. Er versucht neue Ansätze zu […]

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